Call for Papers

ICEBIS 2019 will take place on 05 October 2019 in Bangkok, Thailand. Papers/ abstracts in the fields of business management, politics, communication, culture, economics, education, finance, law, psychology, society and all related-fields are welcomed.

All abstracts/papers should conform to the required format and be uploaded on the website. Submission shall pass the double blind paper review first in order to be presented in the conference. Upon the registration payment, the presentation of accepted submission will be confirmed.

ICEBIS 2019 also provides great opportunity for participants to join networking lunch and networking sessions during the conference.

Who should attend? : Our academic conferences give opportunity to academics, practitioners, consultants, scholars, researchers and policy makers with different backgrounds and experiences, to present their papers in the conference and to discuss their experiences, new ideas, research results, as well as any practical challenges encountered and/or the solutions adopted during their work.

Conference committee highly encourages doctorate (PhD) and postgraduate students to present their research proposal, or literature review, or findings, or issues in this conference with a very special registration fees. Case studies, abstracts of research in progress, as well as full research papers will be considered for the conference program for presentation purposes.

Theme 1: Business & Economics (Banking & Finance, Business Ethics, Economics, Management, E-Commerce, Marketing, Business, Human Resources)

Theme 2: Interdisciplinary Studies 1 (Communications and Media, Film Studies, Creativity, Culture)

Theme 3: Interdisciplinary Studies 2 (Gender Studies, Tourism, Children & Youth, HIV/AIDS, Leadership, Public Policy, Human Rights, Women’s Studies, Security)

Theme 4: Development Studies (Sustainable Development, Urban Studies, Disaster Management, Globalization, Poverty, Globalization)

Theme 5: Information Technology for Business

3. Important Dates

1. Conference Dates                                    : 05 October 2019

2.Deadline of Abstract                                : 31 August 2019

3.Notification of Acceptance (Abstract)        : Within 2 weeks

4.Early bird registration                              : 30 July 2019

5.FULL paper submission                            : 15 July - 05 September 2019

6.Last day of registration                            : 15 September 2019

Author Guidelines

General Guidelines

Essay should be typed, double-spaced on standard-sized paper (8.5" x 11") with 1" margins on all sides, a clear font that is highly readable using 12 pt. Times New Roman font is Recommended. Word count is limited to 4000.

Title Page

The title page should contain the title of the paper, the author's name, and the institutional affiliation. Include the page header (described above) flush left with the page number flush right at the top of the page. Please note that on the title page, your page header/running head should look like this:

Type your title in upper and lowercase letters centered in the upper half of the page. It is recommended that your title be no more than 12 words in length and that it should not contain abbreviations or words that serve no purpose. Your title may take up one or two lines. All text on the title page, and throughout your paper, should be double-spaced.

Beneath the title, type the author's name: first name, middle initial(s), and last name. Do not use titles (Dr.) or degrees (PhD).

Beneath the author's name, type the institutional affiliation, which should indicate the location where the author(s) conducted the research.

Abstract

Begin a new page. Your abstract page should already include the page header (described above). On the first line of the abstract page, center the word “Abstract” (no bold, formatting, italics, underlining, or quotation marks).

Beginning with the next line, write a concise summary of the key points of your research. (Do not indent.) Your abstract should contain at least your research topic, research questions, participants, methods, results, data analysis, and conclusions. You may also include possible implications of your research and future work you see connected with your findings. Your abstract should be a single paragraph double-spaced. Your abstract should be between 150 and 250 words.

You may also want to list keywords from your paper in your abstract. To do this, indent as you would if you were starting a new paragraph, type
Keywords: (italicized), and then list your keywords. Listing your keywords will help researchers find your work in databases.

Tables and Figures

Number all tables with arabic numerals sequentially. Do not use suffix letters (e.g. Table 3a, 3b, 3c); instead, combine the related tables. If the manuscript includes an appendix with tables, identify them with capital letters and arabic numerals (e.g. Table A1, Table B2).

Like the title of the paper itself, each table must have a clear and concise title. When appropriate, you may use the title to explain an abbreviation parenthetically.

Example:
Comparison of Median Income of Adopted Children (AC) v. Foster Children (FC)
Keep headings clear and brief. The heading should not be much wider than the widest entry in the column. Use of standard abbreviations can aid in achieving that goal. All columns must have headings, even the stub column (see example structure), which customarily lists the major independent variables.

In reporting the data, consistency is key: Numerals should be expressed to a consistent number of decimal places that is determined by the precision of measurement. Never change the unit of measurement or the number of decimal places in the same column.

For figures, make sure to include the figure number and a title with a legend and caption. For the figure number, type
Figure X. Then type the title of the figure in sentence case. Follow the title with a legend that explains the symbols in the figure and a caption that explains the figure:

Figure 1. How to create figures in citation. This figure illustrates effective elements in…..
Captions serve as a brief, but complete, explanation and as a title. For example, “
Figure 4. Population” is insufficient, whereas “Figure 4. Population of Grand Rapids, MI by race (1980)” is better. If the figure has a title in the image, crop it.

Graphs should always include a legend that explains the symbols, abbreviations, and terminology used in the figure. These terms must be consistent with those used in the text and in other figures. The lettering in the legend should be of the same type and size as that used in the figure.

Citation

Follow the author-date method of in-text citation. This means that the author's last name and the year of publication for the source should appear in the text, for example, (Jones, 1998), and a complete reference should appear in the reference list at the end of the paper.

If you are referring to an idea from another work but not directly quoting the material, or making reference to an entire book, article or other work, you only have to make reference to the author and year of publication and not the page number in your in-text reference. All sources that are cited in the text must appear in the reference list at the end of the paper.

Capitalization, quotes, and italics/underlining
Always capitalize proper nouns, including author names and initials: D. Jones.
If you refer to the title of a source within your paper, capitalize all words that are four letters long or greater within the title of a source:
Permanence and Change. Exceptions apply to short words that are verbs, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and adverbs: Writing New Media, There Is Nothing Left to Lose.
When capitalizing titles, capitalize both words in a hyphenated compound word:
Natural-Born Cyborgs.

Capitalize the first word after a dash or colon: "Defining Film Rhetoric: The Case of Hitchcock's
Vertigo."

Italicize or underline the titles of longer works such as books, edited collections, movies, television series, documentaries, or albums:
The Closing of the American Mind; The Wizard of Oz; Friends.
Put quotation marks around the titles of shorter works such as journal articles, articles from edited collections, television series episodes, and song titles: "Multimedia Narration: Constructing Possible Worlds"; "The One Where Chandler Can't Cry.

Templates

Journal Article

From [or Adapted from/Data in column 1 are from] “Title of Article,” by A. N. Author and C. O. Author, year, Title of Journal, Volume, p. xx. Copyright [year] by Name of Copyright Holder. Reprinted [or Adapted] with permission.

Book

From [or Adapted from/Data in column 1 are from] Title of Book (any edition or volume information, p. xxx), by A. N. Author and C. O. Author, year, Place of Publication: Publisher. Copyright [year] by Name of Copyright Holder. Reprinted [or Adapted] with permission.

Website

From [or Adapted from/Data in column 1 are from] “Title of Web Document,” by A. N. Author and C. O. Author, year (http://URL). Copyright [year] by Name of Copyright Holder. Reprinted [or Adapted] with permission.

Formatted sample paper can be found here:

Submissions for this conference were closed on 2019-09-16.



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This conference is planned by Siam University International BBA Team